Thursday, September 23, 2010

New Translation Thursday: Malaise and Mystery

Welcome to this installment of "New Translation Thursday."



I don't know about you, but we have entered a period of a kind of malaise around here with respect to the new translation. This waiting period—which we hope will soon come to an end—has us on hold in so many ways.

There is much happening around the country (and the English-speaking world). Many dioceses and archdioceses are contacting us for help as they look toward the reception of the new translation of The Roman Missal. There are many approaches that these dioceses are taking. Some are scheduling reading sessions where one publisher sends a clinician and leads people through that publisher's musical settings. Others are asking each publisher to send copies of several of the Mass settings; then that diocese's musical leaders are preparing regional sessions for the musicians in the diocese. Other dioceses are putting together task forces to plan for the implementation. For the most part, it seems that the majority of dioceses here in the United States have some kind of pastoral plan. They are taking advantage of the various catechetical programs that have surfaced in the last several months. The hope, of course, is that all of this planning and catechesis eventually does shape the minds and hearts of the people in the pews.

I, for one, have a calendar that is quickly filling up with speaking engagements all across the country. Some dioceses have invited me to focus on music for the Mass. Others are asking me to lead sessions for parish and diocesan leadership. Others are asking me to clearly articulate the changes in the translation rules. I am looking forward to all of these opportunities, especially those at which people in the pews are invited to attend. I find these sessions to be the most engaging, the most rattling, and the most exciting. And, as I have said before, anything that gets people talking about the liturgy and its true and deep meaning is well worth the time and effort.

That said, let's keep our hopes up that this will be a time of great renewal for the Church. As you know, I do have some doubts about this, especially given the fact that these last few months have seen the the whole process of translation come under serious scrutiny. What had appeared to be at least a somewhat transparent process turned into a process riddled with mystery. Ah . . . the Church!

Gotta sing. Gotta pray.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

"There are many approaches that these dioceses are taking. Some are scheduling reading sessions where one publisher sends a clinician and leads people through that publisher's musical settings. Others are asking each publisher to send copies of several of the Mass settings"

I would hope they would be encouraged to take the actual music of the actual Missal to heart, by heart, before spending time, energy, money and whatever the human equvalent of "available memory" is, bothering with anything else.
I think a diocesan O of W that doesn't start there is making a grave error, and failing the Faithful.

(Save the Liturgy, Save the World)

Chironomo said...

Ditto with Anon...

The opportunity for renewal called for needs to be the starting point...otherwise there will continue to be conflicts.